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Two Coyote Attacks on Dogs Reported Wednesday

A coyote sighting was first reported in March at Dogwood Park. Now people are saying the coyotes are being spotted in Price Park.

According to the Plain Township, Ohio Community Facebook page, two pet owners reported Wednesday they lost dogs to coyote attacks. 

In March, North Canton Police urged residents to speak up if "wolf-like animals" were spotted in the area after a resident in the 200 block of 7th Street NE reported what he believed to be a wolf-like animal trying to get into a fenced-in ball park at Dogwood Park.

Here's the entire Facebook post from the Plain Township page:

"Friends, we received an e-mail today from our Vet Clinic in North Canton that two customers lost their dogs to coyote attacks over the last few days. There also was a report of a coyote being spotted in Price Park. Take caution when letting your pets out!"

As originally reported by North Canton Patch, Police Chief Stephan Wilder said in a press release:

I do want to emphasize that should anyone see a coyote or like sized animal, that appears to be acting aggressively or menacing toward people or animals, to please call the police department and we will respond to your call for assistance. Our concern is your concern for safety. Just be careful. It's wildlife that is re-entering our county.

Due to these and past reports of coyote sightings in Stark County, this media release is to serve as a public safety reminder for all who live, work or visit the City of North Canton and to be aware of their surroundings for safety’s sake. Safety is a responsibility we all need to share.

Residents are encouraged to report sightings as soon as possible to their local law enforcement agency or for those living within the city to the North Canton Police Department at 330-499-5911.

Are you worried about coyote activity in the area? Are you taking extra precautious with your pets?

Milky Pirate March 29, 2013 at 02:28 AM
I love it when I read these "coyote" articles; they always state that the police were called, but they didn't find anything. First, why did someone call the police? Are the people of this area really so soft that an overgrown wild dog scares them enough that they have to call the authorities? I would hate to see what would happen if a brown bear or pack of wolves showed up in the area -- food shortages, evacuation, and probably mass suicides. Second, did anyone really expect to find anything? I know that the police are just doing their job and making people feel better by looking around, but wild animals generally don't just hang around waiting for humans to come and find them. If you want the problem handled hire some sharp shooters; otherwise, learn to live with the little buggers.
Adam Zorn March 29, 2013 at 02:51 AM
Though not historically native, coyotes were able to expand their range into Ohio and further east due to the extirpation of wolves and other large carnivores in the mid-1800's. By the early 1900's, the first wave of coyotes had immigrated from the west and began to inhabit the state. This is the natural range expansion of a wildlife species over the course of time due to the availability of resources. There are a variety of other species that exist in our area that were not initially recorded in the state but are now quite common, especially species that are habitat generalists and have survival strategies that are compatible with human settlements. In conclusion, we didn't take over their space as you say, we invited them here.
Mary Lynne Zahler March 29, 2013 at 04:57 AM
Oh my gosh, we absolutely have taken over all kinds of wild animals' habitats and space and it makes me laugh out loud that anyone would even try to dispute this fact. Really? This is exactly what I meant when I implied that humans are the most dangerous animals of all. Case in point!
RACHELLE RANDOLPH March 29, 2013 at 08:01 AM
TO MARY ANN Z.-- I ASSUME THAT -YOU- DO NOT HAVE A BELOVED PET DOG OR CAT, THAT GOES OUTSIDE FOR SOME FRESH AIR AND EXERCISE. YES, A CAT CAN BE KEPT INSIDE AND CAN USE THE LITTER PAN. BUT A DOG NEEDS TO GO OUTSIDE TO DO HIS/HER BUSINESS. EVEN IF YOU GO OUT WITH THEM, THEY STILL COULD BE ATTACKED. ALSO, A CHILD COULD BE HARMED OR KILLED, ALSO. WE HAVE A 5 FOOT FENCE, BUT I HAVE READ THAT A COYOTE -HAS- JUMPED A FENCE AND ATTACKED 2 DOGS. SO, WHAT ARE WE SUPPOSED TO DO ?
Why Dothat March 29, 2013 at 11:50 AM
Rachelle, Many of us who love wildlife DO have pets, because we love all animals. We also have children. Noisy children usually scare away wildlife, including coyotes. But small children should always be supervised outside anyway. Their chances of being bitten by a domestic dog or hit by a car are far greater than any coyote threat. ---Coyote bites to humans are rare...about a dozen annually nationwide...and they are usually not serious. Compare this to the 1000 people DAILY who are sent to U.S. emergency rooms for serious bites from domestic dogs. ---You ask about a 5-foot fence for small dogs. Yes, it is likely an excellent deterrent to a coyote. And yes, 6-7 feet is the preferred height for a coyote-proof fence, but like all wildlife, coyotes will prey on the EASIEST food: a field mouse, pet food left outside, open trash cans, etc. ---Again, when letting your dog outside to do its business at night, dawn or dusk, clap your hands and make some noise to clear the premises of wildlife. If it's a small dog, stay outside with it.
Ann Marie March 29, 2013 at 02:30 PM
I agree with your comment 100%. We have taken away these animals homes and therefore they wander into neighborhoods, etc. They usually are only passing through so I do not understand these people calling the police. Also anyone that owns a cat should have to keep it in the house. There should be leash laws like they have for dogs. If you let your cat out to wander don't be surprised if it come up missing or get hurt. That is the owners fault. If you have a cat you should be more responsible for it and keep it indoors. I see a few cats wandering the streets in our neighborhood. It is sad.
Rdwrr March 29, 2013 at 07:01 PM
Maybe the cougar will come back and eat the coyotes this summer.
Mary Lynne Zahler March 30, 2013 at 02:38 AM
It was a mountain lion, not a cougar!
Rdwrr March 30, 2013 at 12:11 PM
The cougar (Puma concolor), also known as the puma, mountain lion, panther, or catamount, is a large cat of the family Felidae native to the Americas.
Bill Jones March 31, 2013 at 03:31 PM
Are you asking us to believe that if we stop building, they'll stop breeding? Get real!
R.A. in the USA March 31, 2013 at 04:51 PM
agreed! We wiped out the little land they have left because we need more strip malls and housing developments and they are the problem?
R.A. in the USA March 31, 2013 at 04:53 PM
Ohio has a lease law, dogs need to be on them...coyotes won't come and take your dogs off the lease people...
R.A. in the USA March 31, 2013 at 04:54 PM
nor is the white man if you really want to go there...
RACHELLE RANDOLPH March 31, 2013 at 07:32 PM
FOR HAVING YOUR DOG ON A LEASH, I TOTALLY WITH THAT, WHEN YOU ARE OUT AND AWAY FROM YOUR HOUSE. BUT, IS IT RECOMMENDED THAT YOU KEEP YOU R DOG ON A LEASH, IN YOUR OWN FENCED-IN BACKYARD?
Yvonne March 31, 2013 at 08:10 PM
I completely agree with Mary Lynne. I ama wildlife rehabilitator and we see the consequences daily of our human impact on the local wildlife. It is the humans who need to be educated in ways that can allow all beings to coexist with one another. We have depleted the wildlife's habitat and now we are upset because they reside so close to us? Where should they go? Instead of grabbing a gun and shooting them why not learn methods to discourage them from coming so close?!? And by the way Rachelle, I am also a veterinary technician, I have many beloved pets and I would not want to see anything happen to them, however, I am the one who is capable of educating myself in order to find various methods to encourage them to steer clear of my area. With the world at our fingertips, we also have knowledge and with that comes power. Do some research or contact your local wildlife facility. And by the way, Canton and Massillon no longer have an animal control program. my heart goes out to those who lost their loved furries. I am sorry. Yvonne
Bill Jones March 31, 2013 at 09:58 PM
The pot calls the kettle black again. Unless you, Mary Lynne, live in the woods amongst the trees and underbrush, and not in a house; shouldn't you be laughing aloud at the likes of yourself? Case in point!
Steve April 01, 2013 at 12:00 AM
Nice comment jim!! It's like this, if I see one of these wolf like creatures I'm sure it's nothing h&k or Springfield can't handle. Then the nice ppl from republic can take care of the rest.
Mary Lynne Zahler April 01, 2013 at 02:32 PM
The cyberbullies are out and trying hard to go at it here. They apparently are too ignorant to make intelligent arguments for their own points of view so they have to attack others online for their rational ones. For the wise folks of NC, it's time to leave this discussion for good and let these rant with their nastiness alone. Enough said!
Bill Jones April 01, 2013 at 05:56 PM
"Enough said!" So if someone doesn't agree with your opinion they're cyberbullies ! ? Sorry ! I wasn't aware that having a difference of opinion makes you a bully. And, I didn't know that you were the moderator of this site. No need for you to leave this discussion; I'll but out. But before I go..............................; FYI, I lost two Yorkies a few years back to Coyotes. They were our kids. It nearly killed us. Don't even think about lecturing me on being a responsible pet owner either. You weren't here, and you don't know how it happened; so don't make a fool of yourself by assuming this, and supposing that. I don't know why I even bothered to click on this thread when I knew there would be those who want to protect every living object on the planet, voicing their righteous opinions. The same people whose houses are filled with mouse traps and insect spray. It must be nice to be the one who decides who / what lives or dies. Coyotes are nowhere on the food chain in this neck of the woods. We are the next ones up the proverbial " food chain" that will have to determine how far their population elevates, and what their boundaries are. Too bad it has to be that way but; that's the reality of it. That's just my opinion, and just like your opinion; it doesn't mean anything to anyone but me. Too much said!
Glen April 01, 2013 at 06:28 PM
Thanks, Bill. Well put.
Why Dothat April 01, 2013 at 06:47 PM
Bill, We all sympathize with you, if you really lost pets to coyotes. However, you and others on this thread have exaggerated the opinions and information provided by commenters. One does not have to be in an animal rights group to appreciate wildlife and seek to coexist with it. ---Regarding coyotes, humans do not have to "determine how far their population elevates." The point here is to supervise our pets and leave coyotes alone, unless they come too close. Then, we can retrain them to keep their distance with proven hazing techniques. ---Wildlife agencies have actually done a terrible job of "managing" wildlife. Most communities are overrun with deer, which were restocked decades ago to please hunters. ---Only about 1/4 of coyote pups make it to adulthood. Just leave them alone and they'll disperse to other territories, when grown. But if you try to "manage" the adults by killing them, the bonded pairs will be broken and rampant breeding and more pups will result.
Steve April 01, 2013 at 07:37 PM
I know, I'll come pitch a tent in your back yard and Mary Lynn's back yard. Ill rotate every other night and we'll see how well you coexist with me. Dances with wolves.
Bill Jones April 02, 2013 at 12:32 AM
Why Do......... I will have to respond with multiple posts since there is a limit to the number of characters allowed per response. Oh gosh; where do I begin. I'll devote this post to your first paragraph. you said.."We all sympathize with you, if you really lost pets to coyotes. However, you and others on this thread have exaggerated the opinions and information provided by commenters. One does not have to be in an animal rights group to appreciate wildlife and seek to coexist with it." "If I really lost pets to coyotes".? Really? Really Mr. DoThat? I have video taped news segments from channels 3 - 5 and 8 to validate my claim. Since you speak for ALL; thank you so much for your sympathy. Tell all your followers on this thread I really appreciate it. Also let them know that their opinions and information hasn't been exaggerated just because it may have been put into a different context that might bring to light the sometimes stupidity of their verbage. You also said... " One does not have to be in an animal rights group to appreciate wildlife and seek to coexist with it." I couldn't agree more. Who said you did?
Bill Jones April 02, 2013 at 12:51 AM
OK! Paragraph 2. Quote Mr. DoThat......."---Regarding coyotes, humans do not have to "determine how far their population elevates." The point here is to supervise our pets and leave coyotes alone, unless they come too close. Then, we can retrain them to keep their distance with proven hazing techniques." quote you....."humans do not have to "determine how far their population elevates." Sure we don't; lets leave that up to the wildlife agencies. The ones who gave us deer to kill for fun, then gave us coyotes to kill the ones that got away, that then in turn kill our beloved pets because there are so many coyotes that there aren't enough deer to go around and yada yada yada.....!. And then this. "The point here is to supervise our pets and leave coyotes alone, unless they come too close." CLASSIC ! You've no doubt adopted that model business plan from what our very own society has evolved to; the decent people are behind locked doors while the criminals roam the streets. Then this beauty..." Then, we can retrain them to keep their distance with proven hazing techniques." I won't even attempt to dignify that with a response. What in gods name are you smoking? You in all your coyote wisdom would have a better chance of seeing god than training a coyote to do anything. Puhleeeeeez!
Bill Jones April 02, 2013 at 01:12 AM
Last but not least.......... Quoting Mr Dothat again.............." ---Only about 1/4 of coyote pups make it to adulthood. Just leave them alone and they'll disperse to other territories, when grown. But if you try to "manage" the adults by killing them, the bonded pairs will be broken and rampant breeding and more pups will result." " Only about 1/4 of coyote pups make it to adulthood." How reassuring is that! So lets do the math here Einstein. So lets pretend there are 1,000 coyotes in the area; 500 male, 500 female. They hook up and give birth to, lets be conservative and say a total of 6 pups per happily married couple. For a total of 3,000 puppies. But only about 750 of them will make it. THIS SEASON ! Boy, that's a real relief. And don't forget, leave them alone so they can relocate and do it again. This just in........." But if you try to "manage" the adults by killing them, the bonded pairs will be broken and rampant breeding and more pups will result." Damned if you do, and damned if you don't huh!
Bill Jones April 02, 2013 at 01:15 AM
Steve, watch out, you might get what you ask for. You'd probably co-exist well with what's her name; but coyotes or wolves makes no difference to me. There'll be no dancing in my back yard.
Steve April 02, 2013 at 01:48 AM
Sleep it off bro!
Why Dothat April 02, 2013 at 12:21 PM
Bill, You obviously love animals. I urge you to read up on coyotes. They are highly intelligent animals that are closely related to the pets you lost. ---Coyotes don't live in the density you describe. A coyote bonded pair or small family of 3-4 coyotes will defend a 10-square mile territory from incoming, transient coyotes. Only the bonded pair, the alpha male and female will breed, and only once a year. Both parents help raise the litter. ---If there are 3 coyotes, one is usually a female from the previous year's litter, that has stayed behind to help raise the next litter. This adult female does not breed. ---The average coyote litter is 6-8 pups. If it's a good year, 2 pups survive...they would simply carry on the species. The average life span of a coyote in the wild is only 5-10 years. ---However, if people randomly kill the alpha male or female, the remaining coyote and its tiny family cannot fend off incoming, transient coyotes. More will pour into the territory (your neighborhood?) and mate with the young females. You will end up with far more coyotes and pups, than if you let nature take its course and just left the coyotes in the woods alone. ---Hazing is working nationwide. For instance, ranchers in Marin County, CA no longer use USDA's expensive Wildlife Services to kill coyotes. The ranchers have adopted good practices and are using hazing, so that coyotes avoid farms where they are met with lights, loud noises, guard dogs and secure fences.
Bill Jones April 02, 2013 at 08:35 PM
Steve, Thank you for that. That's without question the best advice put forth in this whole discussion. I'm on it ! ZZZZZZZZZZZZ ! Over and out.
Bill Jones April 02, 2013 at 08:37 PM
Denial is not just a river in Egypt. Wake up!

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