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The Blizzard of '78: Share Your Memories, Photos

35 years ago this week, the Blizzard of 78 paralyzed Ohio, Michigan and Indiana

With temperatures peaking in the upper 50s this week in North Canton and across Northeast Ohio, it’s a perfect example of how unpredictable the weather can be.

It 35 years ago this week, the “Blizzard of ‘78” struck; a stark contrast to this week's weather.

Formally referred to as the Great Blizzard of 1978,  dumped more than a foot snow from Jan. 25-27.  That was accompanied by temperatures dipping to 0 and wind gusts of up to 48 mph, according to the National Weather Service’s storm review.

The Blizzard was deemed the worst in Ohio history, resulting in 51 deaths. More than 50,000 members of the Ohio National Guard were called in to make numerous rescues and for the first time ever, the entire Ohio Turnpike was closed down.

Michigan declared a state of emergency and Indiana declared a snow emergency. Regionally, snow drifts reached heights of 25 feet.

By the time the snow stopped falling on Jan. 29, Ohio had more than a foot of snow and South Bend, IN had more than 3 feet of snow.

The Butler County Engineer’s Office in Buffalo called the event a “severe blizzard.”

“Wind speeds, by that time, had reached the 70 mile per hour range and gusts of more than 100 miles per hour downed power lines, billboards, mobile homes, and tree limbs,” the site reported. “An entire semi-trailer truck was buried in one snow bank near Mansfield. The driver was not rescued until nearly a week later.”

According to OhioHistoryCentral.org, “With temperatures already hovering near zero, the wind chill was deadly, reaching sixty degrees Fahrenheit below zero. Thousands of people were stranded in their cars and in their homes. For the first time in its history, the entire Ohio Turnpike closed due to the blizzard's severity.. Thousands of homes and businesses lost electricity.”

A week and a half later, the  Northeastern United States Blizzard of 1978 (also referred to as the Blizzard of ’78) struck the northeast, paralyzing Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut and parts of New York.

In that storm, 54 people died. One tragic death included 10-year-old Peter Gosselin, of Uxbridge, Massachusetts who disappeared in the deep snow just feet from his home's front door but was not found until three weeks later.

Do you have memories or photos of either storm? Share them below.

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